Lost Fuchsia: Emily Doel
Lost Fuchsias / 17/05/2018

This week’s lost fuchsia is ‘Emily Doel‘, which was introduced in 1882 and we are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will help us to find more information about this historic cultivar.  Does anyone know who Emily Doel was?   Description: Current Status: Believed lost to cultivation Year of Introduction: 1882 Flower Type: Single Tube Colour: White Sepals Colour: White Corolla Colour: Rose Foliage Colour: Unknown (suspected Green)   Additional Clues on where this cultivar has previously been listed to help our detectives: Gardeners Chronicle. Edition 6/9/1884 Exhibited at Trowbridge on 20/8/1884 by G Tucker. Laings Catalogue. Circa 1890 H Cannell Catalogue. Page78, 1882 This cultivar sometimes appears as ‘Emily Doels’, we suspect that this is the same cultivar and a typographical error,  but we need evidence to prove this.  Are you able to help solve this? We are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will find some information about this historic cultivar, through historical resources, such as the ‘Gardeners’ Chronicle‘ and nursery catalogues, if any of our detectives are living in Europe they could consult their own country’s historical journals, as we know James Lye’s fuchsias have appeared in German publications such as ‘Garten Zeitung‘. Any information you can share with…

Lost Fuchsia: Royal Standard
Lost Fuchsias / 02/05/2018

This week’s lost fuchsia is ‘Royal Standard‘, which was introduced in 1877 and we are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will help us to find more information about this historic cultivar. Description: Current Status: Believed lost to cultivation Year of Introduction: 1877 Flower Type: Single Tube Colour: Bright Red Sepals Colour: Bright Red Corolla Colour: Plum Purple Foliage Colour: Green   Additional Clues on where this cultivar has previously been listed to help our detectives: B. S. Williams Catalogue, 1878 H. Cannell Catalogue, 1882 ‘Fine strong growing plant, one of the best for large plants’ Laings Catalogue, 1890 Gardeners Chronicle, 1877 The Floral Magazine, 1877 Gardeners Oracle ‘Selection’, 1880-1881 We are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will find some information about this historic cultivar, through historical resources, such as the ‘Gardeners’ Chronicle‘ and nursery catalogues, if any of our detectives are living in Europe they could consult their own country’s historical journals, as we know James Lye’s fuchsias have appeared in German publications such as ‘Garten Zeitung‘. Any information you can share with us (however small) will help us and other fuchsia detectives in the search.

Lost Fuchsia: Miss Welch

  This weeks lost fuchsia is ‘Miss Welch’, which was introduced around 1885. We know very little about this cultivar, to our knowledge there appears to be only one description of this cultivar and no known images. We suspect that the fuchsia is linked to a member of James Welch‘s family, because James Lye and James Welch were known to each other as they both lived in Market Lavington and sat on the parish council.  It may be possible to link the naming of this fuchsia through census records and James Welch was the Secretary of the Wiltshire Agricultural Association. Additional Clues on where this cultivar has previously been listed to help our detectives: Mentioned in the John Forbes Catalogue, 1885 We are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will find some information about this historic cultivar, through historical resources, such as the Gardeners’ Chronicle, if any of our detectives are living in Europe they could consult their own countries historical journals, as we know James Lye’s fuchsias have appeared in German publications, as well as searching nursery catalogues. Any information you can share with us (however small) will help us and other fuchsia detectives in the search. #lostfuchsias #harperdebbage #nationalplantcollection #plantheritage…

Lye’s Fuchsias
Fuchsias / 05/01/2018

The group of Fuchsias an engraving of which appears at fig. 39 (used as this posts image), represents a collection of nine specimens raised and exhibited by that well-known cultivator, Mr. James Lye, of Clyffe Hall Gardens, Market Lavington, at an exhibition held in Bath in September last, and which recieved the 1st prize in the premier class for that number of plants.  For many years past Mr. Lye has exhibited Fuchsias at exhibitions held at Bath, Trowbridge, Devizes, Calne, Chippenham, and elsewhere; on all occassions staging specimens of a high order of merit; but the plants appearing in our illustration were universally regarded as the best he had ever placed in an exhibition tent.  So much were the committee of the Bath show pleased with the specimens that they engaged the services of a photographer to make a picutre of them on the spot; but after being two hours making the attempt, no satisfactory result occurred.  After the plants were taken back to Clyffe Hall, they were photographed as seen in the illustration. So idea of their height and dimensions can be reaslised by a comparison with the stature of Mr. Lye, who is standing by his plants and…

James Lye’s Obituary
James Lye , Market Lavington / 14/02/2016

James Lye. – On Saturday last, at a ripe age, a victim to paralysis, there passed away at Market Lavington, Wilts., a gardener in the person of James Lye, who had the warm esteem and regard of a wide circle of friends, and who had made for himself a good name in horticulture.  For very many years he was Gardener at Clyffe Hall, Market Lavington, and there gave his attention largely to the raising and growing of Fuchsias and Potatoes. Whilst the varieties of the latter which he raised have been elbowed out of commerce by newer ones, many of his Fuchsias to-day still rank amongst the very best in cultivation – indeed, none are more beautiful, have better habits, or flower more abundantly.  Mr. Lye was a very capable raiser and first class grower of specimens, and the noble pyramids he grew at Clyffe Hall, 9 to 10 feet in height, and referred to in an article in Gardeners’ Chronicle, February 14, 1885, were never excelled out of the West of England. He had retired from active life for several years, but still retained his love for Fuchsia-raiding to the last. A.D.   From: The Gardeners’ Chronicle, February 14, 1906….