New Fuchsias – The Floral Magazine – 1877

Plate 277. NEW FUCHSIAS The group of new varieties of Fuchsias forming this plate are part of a batch of fine seedlings raised by Mr. James Lye, gardener to the Hon. Mrs. Hay, Cliffe Hall, Market Lavington, Wilts. Mr. Lye is a well known in the West of England as an exhibitor and cultivator of Fuchsias, and the specimen plants he is in the habit of exhibiting at Flower Shows at Bath, Trowbridge, Chippenham, Calne, and at other places are remarkable for their splendid size, superb growth, and wonderful floriferousness. It is worthy of note that while the cultivation of the Fuchsia as an exhibition plant has declined in many parts of the country, it has reached a stage of high development in Wiltshire. In no other part of the country can such specimens be seen. In the course of cultivating Fuchsias for show purposes, Mr. Lye found that many fine varieties were unfitted by their habit of growth and sparseness of bloom as exhibition plants, and this led him to turn his attention to the raising of seedlings fitted for show and decorative purposes. His latest batch of seedlings answer these ends in such a remarkable degree as to…

New Fuchsias – Journal of Horticulture and Cottage Gardener – 1899

NEW FUCHSIAS The revival of popularity which Fuchsias now enjoy as bedding plants lends interest to the work of those few raisers who from time to time put into trade new and distinct varieties.  Of these raisers few have during the past thirty years presented for cultivation more or better varieties than has the veteran James Lye, of Market Lavington. This excellent gardener, after some fifty years’ service at Clyffe Hall, with the late Hon. Mrs. Hay, is now residing at Easterton, a village half a mile east of Market Lavington.  He still, from time to time, raises new varieties and also grows those fine specimen plants which, through him and his disciples in culture, have made the West of England shows so famous for noble Fuchsias.  Such plants, indeed, as are no never seen in the metropolis, or in other directions. A very fine stock of tall specimens now at Easterton comprises nearly all varieties that are not yet in commerce.  They vary according to habit of variety from 5 feet to 7 feet in the pots, and all so well grown as to be perfectly finished.  They are in pots ranging from 12 inches to 15 inches in…

Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2016 – Bronze Award

For the first time we exhibited a floral display of our Plant Heritage, National Plant collection of Fuchsia cultivars introduced by James Lye at the Royal Horticultural Society,  Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in July (5th – 10th) 2016. Our concept for our first ever RHS Show exhibit was to display some of the National Plant Collection of Fuchsia cultivars introduced by James Lye, on a traditional tiered staging in Victorian clay pots.  We were keen to display the plants in a natural (untrained) habit, in different stages of flower so that visitors could see how the fuchsias would grow if untrained and that there is a succession of flowering once the plants starts to flowers. The display also provided information about the fact that the flowers and berries of fuchsias are edible, for this we also used F. procumbens which is an unusual mat-forming fuchsia specie, which has small, heart-shaped leaves and solitary, erect, pale orange flowers, with reflexed sepals which are deep purple with a green base, and the usual stamens with blue pollen. Our main interpretation panel (which is on the side of our display) highlighted three key areas, James Lye, Edible Fuchsias and Fuchsia History. We…

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