Lost Fuchsia: Miss Welch

  This weeks lost fuchsia is ‘Miss Welch’, which was introduced around 1885. We know very little about this cultivar, to our knowledge there appears to be only one description of this cultivar and no known images. We suspect that the fuchsia is linked to a member of James Welch‘s family, because James Lye and James Welch were known to each other as they both lived in Market Lavington and sat on the parish council.  It may be possible to link the naming of this fuchsia through census records and James Welch was the Secretary of the Wiltshire Agricultural Association. Additional Clues on where this cultivar has previously been listed to help our detectives: Mentioned in the John Forbes Catalogue, 1885 We are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will find some information about this historic cultivar, through historical resources, such as the Gardeners’ Chronicle, if any of our detectives are living in Europe they could consult their own countries historical journals, as we know James Lye’s fuchsias have appeared in German publications, as well as searching nursery catalogues. Any information you can share with us (however small) will help us and other fuchsia detectives in the search. #lostfuchsias #harperdebbage #nationalplantcollection #plantheritage…

Wiltshire Life – Covers the Lost Fuchsia Hunt
Lost Fuchsias , Wiltshire / 17/04/2018

The Wiltshire Life magazine has covered our hunt for James Lye’s lost fuchsias in their Home and Gardens Supplement, which is issued with the May edition of Wiltshire Life.   The full-page article provides details of the lost fuchsia hunt and encourages readers to put Wiltshire back on the horticultural map, by engaging in the hunt for the lost fuchsias of James Lye who is one of the most important Victorian fuchsia growers and exibitors, who came from Market Lavington in Wiltshire. Notes about Wiltshire Life: Wiltshire Life was established in 1946 and is Wiltshire’s leading county magazine. It looks both forwards and backwards, bringing its readers some of the best stories about county traditions while also keeping them up to date on more recent innovations. They cover the entire county, from Swindon in the north to Salisbury in the south, and from Marlborough in the east to Trowbridge in the west.  Wiltshire Life’s winning formula of stunning photography, well written features and strong design has made it the magazine to read. It is packed with interesting and topical features on county personalities, village life, walking, local history, food and drink, gardening, the arts and much more. #lostfuchsias #Wiltshire #jameslye #harperdebbage

Lost Fuchsia: Duchess of Fife
James Lye , Lost Fuchsias / 10/04/2018

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘Duchess of Fife’, which was introduced in 1892. We know very little about this cultivar and are hoping that our fuchsia detectives will  help us to find more information about this historic cultivar. On this occasion the partner named fuchsia ‘Duke of Fife’, doesn’t appear to have been introduced by James Lye (like the Duke of Albany and Duchess of Albany) instead the ‘Duke of Fife’ appears to have been introduced by another keen fuchsia grower, Edward Banks (from Sholden Hall, Kent) in 1894. As we know very little about this cultivar,  we are providing some information about the person we believe James may have named the cultivar after in the hope that this may lead to some further information. We suspect that the fuchsia cultivar ‘Duchess of Fife’ is named after the 2nd Duchess who was born in 1891.    Princess Arthur of Connaught, 2nd Duchess of Fife, RRC, GCStJ (Alexandra Victoria Alberta Edwina Louise Duff).  Alexandra was a granddaughter of King Edward VII and great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria. The  titles and styles of the 2nd Duchess of Fife: 17 May 1891 – 9 November 1905: Lady Alexandra Duff 9 November 1905 – 29 January 1912: Her Highness Princess Alexandra…

Lost Fuchsia: Crimson Globe

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘Crimson Globe’, which was introduced in 1879 (Though we suspect that it may have been introduced slightly earlier). The Gardeners Chronicle (29/11/1879) – provides a brief description of this cultivar and refers to the colour plate published by the Floral Magazine in September 1879. The image and description from the Floral Magazine, can be found in one of our earlier posts The Gardeners Chronicle mentioned this cultivar again in 1885 in a report on the Fuchsia Trails at Chiswick. This item also mentions ‘Ellen Lye’ and ‘Charming’. Some Additional Clues to help our detectives: Mentioned in the John Forbes Catalogue, 1885 Mentioned in the Laings Catalogue, c1890 We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing, and when it was last seen or listed in a nursery catalogue or publication. Any information you can share will help us and other fuchsia detectives helping us in the search. #lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #flowershow #chiswick #nursery #catalogue

Lost Fuchsia: Louisa Balfour

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘Lousia Balfour’, we do not know when she was introduced and at present have a limited description of her. We understand that this fuchsia was named after Louisa Balfour who was born in 1852 in Darjeeling, India. Daughter of George G. and Juliana G. Balfour. From the census we can follow her travels: 1881 she was living at Middle Green, Langley-Marsh, Buckinghamshire. 1891 she visited Louisa Hay at Clyffe Hall, Market Lavington. 1901she visted Margaret Ewart at Broadleaye Park, Roundway. 1911 she resided at Eastbury Manor, Crompton, Guildford. There appears to be little information regarding this cultivar. Some Clues: Mentioned in Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society Reportedly, extensively used by James Lye as a seed parent. We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing, when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Is it possible there was another Louisa Balfour who this cultivar could be named after, but considering this one stayed at Clyffe Hall unlikely. Any information you can share will help us and other fuchsia detectives helping in the search. #lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias…

Lost Fuchsia: Walter Long
James Lye , Lost Fuchsias / 20/03/2018

We believe that this fuchsia is named after Walter Hume Long, who was born in Bath in 1854, and married Lady Dorothy (Doreen) Blanche, daughter of Richard Boyle, 9th Earl of Cork, in 1878. Walter died in 1924 at Rood Ashton House in Wiltshire. During his political career which spanned over 40 years, Walter held office as President of the Board of Agriculture, President of the Local Government Board, Chief Secretary for Ireland, Secretary of State for the Colonies and First Lord of the Admiralty. He is also remembered for his links with Irish Unionism, and served as Leader of the Irish Unionist Party in the House of Commons from 1906 to 1910. He was appointed Lord-Lieutenant of Wiltshire in February 1920, and was raised to the peerage as Viscount Long of Wraxall in the County of Wiltshire in May 1921. Note: The Royal Commission on Agriculture, meet at Trowbridge on 18 January 1893. Some Clues: The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘Walter Long’ appeared in the following nursery catalogues, John Forbes (1888), B S Williams (1888), W J Bull (1889-93), H. Cannell (1892). We would love to see images of these catalogue entries, with references in the Gardeners Chronicle and Gardeners Oracle….

Lost Fuchsia: C. N. May
James Lye , Lost Fuchsias / 12/03/2018

C. N. May (Charles Neale May, born in Reading). Mr May was instrumental in resurrecting the Devizes Flower Show, in 1880 (Devizes Horticultural Society). In 1882 the show was held on the 7th August at Roundway Park, the residence of C. E. Colston, Esq. Charles May founded with Mr Brown, ‘Brown and May’ a North Wiltshire Foundry based in Devizes in 1854, which was the largest employer in the area, and exported its machinery all over the world. Charles was Mayor of Devizes in 1868. By 1871 he and his wife lived at Spittlecroft House. In 1889 he was listed as a Director of ‘The North Wilts Dairy Company Limited’, of Elm Lodge, Devizes and was a JP (Justice of the Peace) for the borough of Devizes. Charles died in 1908 and is buried at St. James, Southbroom, Devizes. During the period 1891-1908 he appears to be living Seaton, East Devon. The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘C. N. May’ appears in the following nursery catalogues, W J Bull, B S Williams, John Forbes. We would love to see images of these catalogue entries. We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating…

Lost Fuchsia: James Welch
James Lye , Lost Fuchsias / 05/03/2018

Today’s lost fuchsia is ‘James Welch’, James was born in 1856 and married Annie Earle in London in 1887. The Fuchsia Annie Earle has survived and is held within our Plant Heritage, National Plant Collection. We would love to find James so that we can reunite the couple. James was the Secretary of the Wiltshire Agricultural Association (Society) for many years and a founder member of the Market Lavington Parish Council and its chairman from 1915-1919). The Fuchsia Cultivar ‘James Welch’ appeared several times in the Gardeners Chronicle first in 1885 as a new fuchsia for 1886, and had listings in following nursery catalogue’s, John Forbes, Dobbies, W J Bull, B S Williams. We would love to see these listings.. We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Any information you can share will help others in the search. #lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #trowbridge #bath #cultivar #agricultural #marketlavington #gardeners, #dobbies, #forbes #welch #london

Lost Fuchsia: Hon. Mrs Hay
James Lye , Lost Fuchsias / 26/02/2018

‘Hon. Mrs Hay’ is named after James Lye’s employer, Hon. Mrs. Louisa Hay (nee. Pleydell Bouverie). Louisa was the daughter of Captain (afterwards Admiral) the Hon. Duncombe Pleydell-Bouverie, (son of the 2nd Earl of Radnor of Longford Castle) and Louisa May. Louisa married Captain Hon. Samuel Hay (son of the 17th Earl of Erroll of Slains Castle) in 1832. Louisa spent nearly all her life at Clyffe Hall. We know this fuchsia cultivar was exhibited at horticultural shows at Trowbridge and Bath and received prizes. We hope that our fuchsia #detectives will help us find more information about this #fuchsia cultivar including information relating to its first listing or when it was last seen or listed in a #nursery catalogue. Any information you can share will help others in the search. #lostfuchsias #wiltshire #nationalplantcollection #harperdebbage #fuchsias #horticulture #earl #Radnor #Erroll #longsford #castle #slains #clan #hay #pleydell #bouverie #trowbridge #bath #cultivar

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